‘The Red Pill’ Delves Into the Men’s Rights Movement

“The Red Pill” movie poster.

by Josh Morris

“If men have all the power, why can’t they talk about their problems?”

Have you ever thought the Men’s Rights Movement might actually have some validity? Have you been warned of its “toxic appeal?” That it’s a hate group?

Have you ever even heard of it?

I imagine most people haven’t. Truthfully, I also hadn’t heard very much about the Men’s Right Movement (MRM) until I watched the “The Red Pill,” a documentary written/directed/produced by Cassie Jaye. The film was released on VOD March 7 (yes, it was probably timed to coincide with International Women’s Day on March 8), but had its official opening last year.

And, yes, it certainly has some appeal, though I don’t know if “toxic” accurately describes it.

The film starts with Jaye’s backstory. She guides us through the personal journey that led her to embrace feminism as a young adult and prompted her to migrate from the front of the camera (she had aspired to be an actress) to behind it; she has found much more fulfillment as a director and less misogyny.

As Jaye was researching what to tackle for her third documentary, she came across a website titled “A Voice for Men,” and was very much intrigued. What followed was a years-long exploration into the lives of the people behind the MRM.

It was not an easy tour to take, as we discover.

In fact, what Jaye navigates is an upstream torrent of censorship, misunderstanding and extreme bitterness (if not hate). But that can come from both sides of the gender equality spectrum not just from the MRM, as some would have us believe. Most of the interviewees are rational individuals; calm, collected and quite civil.

The “red pill” is a reference to “The Matrix.” It symbolizes the choice between understanding the “true” nature of your reality versus existing comfortably in fantasyland. It’s catchy, sure, but it’s almost cliché already. Not to mention, it’s more than a bit presumptuous to assume you, your “group” and/or your ideology has access to the ultimate source of “truth.”

Indeed, it’s exactly that fanaticism that Jaye is caught in the middle of. As a feminist, it was her intention to combat or expose the MRM, but instead she ultimately becomes sympathetic to their cause.

But what is their cause exactly? According to their website it is ultimately “to promote a culture that values equal treatment under the law for all human beings.” As opposed to, say, giving women any form of special treatment, including chivalry.

“The Red Pill” is successful as a documentary because it starts a dialogue about these issues; not because it promotes blindly embracing the MRM or arguing against the efforts of suffrage, feminism and/or gender equality.

An example of this can be found in its examination of “The Patriarchy.” In the film (and in general) there’s not much debate that the patriarchy actually exists. But the dialogue allows an investigation as to why it might exist for different reasons than feminism constitutes; the MRM suggests patriarchy exists because of gender roles. Not the other way around. Culture and feminist critic Camille Paglia (a female) might argue those gender roles are actually based on fundamental sex differences; but the film doesn’t delve into that debate.

Further, there’s also the implication that at least some men are just as oppressed by the patriarchy as women. What other conclusion can be drawn from the fact that close to 99 percent of all military deaths are males? Or 78 percent of suicides? Or 94 percent of work-related deaths?

The MRM opposes the view that men should be the “disposable sons” of society.

For the most part, Jaye is simply presenting the facts as they are being presented to her; she isn’t necessarily building a case. In fact, the most intriguing segments in the film are her video diaries: as she reflects on what she is learning, as she questions her presuppositions, as she evolves, she positions herself with the rest of her audience who is undoubtedly experiencing something similar.

Jaye understands how the ideas of the MRM will be new (if not shocking) to most of us, and it is precisely because of her empathetic approach that we feel compelled to follow her down “the rabbit hole.”

Eventually, she starts to wonder, “Don’t feminists and the MRM have more in common than people think? Shouldn’t both sides working together for a more encompassing gender equality movement? Why aren’t they?” For the most part, those questions remain unanswered.

And how can they be if films like this one can’t get funded?

A major theme in the film is the active silencing of the Men’s Rights Movement: their needs, theirs struggles and their histories drowned out by protests, slander and fire alarms. Jaye similarly suffered when her funding was pulled and crewmembers abandoned the project once she began taking a sympathetic, non-combative view.

If “the truth is somewhere in the middle,” as Jaye claims, no one should be silenced. Ignored. Unchallenged.

To fully analyze the film, its claims and the stats presented as evidence would take countless hours. But as far as a review goes, there isn’t much else to critique. “The Red Pill” is an excellent documentary; eye-opening, schema-challenging, fair, genuine and compelling.

Like Ms. Jaye, I was skeptical of the voices behind the MRM (as well as her eventual sympathy towards them). Yet as I viewed the film, if I questioned something Jaye would eventually circle back, reexamine and/or follow through sufficiently.

Towards the film’s conclusion, there is a kind of hurried wrap-up in which Jaye only briefly touches upon some issues (circumcision, prostate cancer funding versus breast cancer funding) that could each be investigated in a documentary of their own. Since “The Red Pill” runs almost two full hours, we grant her leave from any further investigations; the scope of this subject (and this is pointed out in the film) is far too broad for any one documentary to fully capture.

For that matter, it is far too broad for any one director. Or professor. Or school. Or any one “side” of the issues. That’s precisely why initiating a conversation is so vitally paramount. This is something that requires further research, and not just by those who may benefit from it; that is, not just white males. Scrutiny, therefore, is also needed.

Not all viewers will agree (nor should they, necessarily) with the conclusions reached. Rigorous debate is expected. But the feeling I got after watching “The Red Pill” is that it will become a staple of the more balanced gender studies programs of the future, even if that’s decades from now.

On a personal level: I am a white male, but I too came to call myself a feminist in my college years; education and my life experiences (especially being raised by a single-mother who didn’t make much money) made it easy to do so. While earning a degree in both film and sociology, which I say not to gloat but rather to establish my own context, I have watched dozens and dozens of documentaries. I have studied documentary techniques, social movements and inequalities. And based on that foundation, I would argue that “The Red Pill” has merit.

The film ends with Jaye stating, “I no longer call myself a feminist.” Spending years face-to-face with Men’s Rights advocates may warrant such a conclusion. I still consider myself a feminist, but I also feel persuaded to dig a little deeper in to all of this.   

5.00 avg. rating (98% score) - 7 votes

42 Responses to ‘The Red Pill’ Delves Into the Men’s Rights Movement

  1. what is the difference between the MRM and the MGTOW movement??

    • MGTOW seek to separate from women. Usually it’s a lot of bitter and angry men who have lost kids or have burned in a divorce. There are som overlaps on men’s issues, but a lot of MRAs find MGTOW full of misogyny and woman-blaming, kind of like “All women are gold diggers!” type of stuff. MGTOW can often reaffirm traditional masculinity whereas many MRAs question traditional masculinity and gender roles.

    • MGTOW is “Men Going Their Own Way” and is about men finding their own personal fulfillment regardless of society’s expectations. This typically includes the exclusion of social interactions with women in part because they perceive the legal and social balance of power to favor women and in part because of the societal expectation that “real men” get married. They acknowledge the issues faced by men in society but, rather than deal with them, they choose to distance themselves from the expectations placed on men by society which lead to many of the issues faced by men. Like all movements, there is a radical element within it which completely eschews women and any involvement with them.

      The MRM are people who recognize that men face their own set of issues within society and try to raise awareness of these issues, rather than walking away from them, so that society might address them. The MRM is sort of like Feminism for men. Though, generally, they will not align themselves with Feminism, or Feminists, as a whole. There are a few Feminist allies though. The MRM will not align with Feminism due to a variety of reasons. Some have tried, and have been shunned. Others recognize that certain aspects of Feminism contribute, in part, to some of the issues faced by men (they see things such as manspreading, mansplaining, #killallmen as vilification of men). Another reason given is that they feel men should be allowed to be their own voice and shouldn’t have to align with Feminists, or Feminism, in order for their voice to be heard.

      Though there is some overlap between the two movements, they are two different movements with different goals.

    • Hi, Capt. — There is some discussion about that in “The Red Pill,” if I remember correctly. Did you watch the movie? If not, maybe start there.

    • MGTOW are men who have had enough and will not feed the system anymore. they will leave it and live without it if they can. avoid being used by the government or women. and go their own way.

      MRM is a group of men trying to change the system for equality.

    • MGTOW is about personally avoiding or withdrawing from involvement with women — opting out of the system. The MRM is about organizing to change the system.

    • Essentially the message of the Mens Rights Movement is to make people aware that because of gynocentrism and the false narrative of feminism, society lives under a false reality which seriously undermines the human right of equality (where applicable) between men and women. One of the key objectives of the Mens Rights Movement is for people to logically consider the actual facts, instead of blindly following and being indoctrinated by an ideology based on a theory. In a nutshell, Men’s Rights Activists reveal actual discrimination and the blatant undermining of human rights that should be equally applicable to men in a fair and just society that values human rights for all – irrespective of gender. Both men and women are part of the MRM.

      Men Going Their Own Way (MGTOW) are to a large extent individuals who are well aware of the toxic nature of society – the failure of society to accept that domestic violence is not a gendered issue, men being treated with contempt in the Family Courts, etc. Such men consider the potential risk to their psychological health, being callously torn away from their own children for no other reason, but being male, the total financial destruction of losing everything they have worked for – such men consider the “investment” of entering into a marriage or relationship far to dangerous because they know exactly the consequences that result when things go pear-shaped. More and more men are opting to live independently without raising a family or supporting anyone else. Some will look at the behaviour and conduct of many women of the last few generations and consider them not to be worthy of marriage or any form of commitment. MGTOW is reactionary conduct towards a broken and troubled society that is dismally failing to provide a fair, unbiased environment for the creation of stable family life. Governments are viewed with contempt because of the support given to powerful feminists that have penetrated the system and are actively promoting policies that are highly discriminatory when considered against the yardstick of equal human rights.

    • Hello Captain,
      I skimmed some of the answers here, and I thought I would weigh in on your question. The major difference is that MGTOW is actually not a movement, philosophy, or ideology though many have built up all those trappings around it. Many on both sides want it to be so they can attack it or try to annex it. However, if you look at the drivers that make a MGTOW you come to see it as what it is. A symptom given a name. MGTOW scares some, and angers others.

      The reason I say it is a symptom is that there are men living what many would call the MGTOW lifestyle, but have no idea of the MRM, MHRM, MGTOW, or the Man-o-sphere outside of negative mainstream media stories. The symptom is not against women though many liken it to a, “He man woman hater’s club.” It is a symptom that removes men from all of society, and culture.

      Men who opt out not only on children, marriage, and even co-habitation, but living as society dictates they should. An example of a MGTOW reaction is the men who ignored the standard women, and children first when the Costa Concordia struck a reef in 2012.

      It was not many men who got into life boats ignoring long standing cultural traditions, and most who commented on it simply called them all cowards, and talked about how despicable they were. However, none of them questioned why it never even bothered these few men who got on lifeboats, and ignored all calls for them to get off the life boats.

      These men didn’t want to die, and saw no reason to render their lives up for anyone’s benefit. This is the symptom created by a society that sees men as meat for the grinder, and not much else. Young men see how veterans are treated, how young men in university can have their basic rights abused, how every outlet tells them they must check their privilege, that masculinity is toxic, and fragile, that they are emotionally closed off, end fathers day, kill all men, and yet they have bro feels to be hurt, they need to shut up, and sit down.

      These young men see how family court, and divorce court treat them, they see the Duluth Model in action. They don’t have to go read it on a men’s site, or a feminist site. The can catch it in the schools that make them stand up, and pledge before the whole student body not to rape. They get it when gender studies, and social justice classes are forced on them in university. They see it in company handbooks that always define sexual harassment as men doing it to women. They see it in domestic violence stories that report that all men are the aggressors, and ignore when women are.

      The reaction to bathing in a caustic solution is to ball up, and protect yourself. The reaction to a caustic society is to leave it. In Japan this reaction is known as the Herbivore Man. Unlike his western counterpart the MGTOW, the Herbivore is completely sex negative, and family negative.

      When the Japanese Government floated the idea of a bachelors tax to get Herbivores to marry the reaction was they would pay the tax, and stay single or leave the country to work elsewhere. The Japanese Government now pays a bonus to couples who have children. Then again the Japanese have started an extinction clock because their birth rate is below even the levels needed to keep their infrastructure running. In a hundred years or so their may come a day when there are no more native Japanese.

      It is important to note that feminism did not create the Herbivore Man he is a result of societal, and cultural factors. MGTOW were not created by feminism either, but feminism amplified the factors present that lead to the MGTOW symptom. If you listen to the nearly 70% of young men today who do not go to university you will hear many of the MGTOW traits echoed in their lifestyle choices. Even when they have no idea what MGTOW or any of this is outside of the facade of feminism in the media. The symptom of MGTOW is far larger than most think I believe. It’s full extent will not be known until we are faced with a disaster or major war.

      -my 2 cents-

  2. Full disclosure: I sponsored this movie’s Kickstarter and have a credit for doing so.

    One problem I’ve had when discussing men’s/boy’s issues is that it would always descend into a pointless debate to give justification to the MRM. I hope this movie does nothing more than end this, which is looking increasingly likely.

    Hopefully from here on I can have constructive discussions about important issues and not be merely dismissed out of hand.

    To the author of this review: This is the fairest , most accurate review I’ve read yet. Well done.

  3. “But that can come from both sides of the gender equality spectrum not just from the MRM”

    Please provide a single example of “torrent of censorship, misunderstanding and extreme bitterness (if not hate)” from the MRM. Please.

    “it’s more than a bit presumptuous to assume you, your “group” and/or your ideology has access to the ultimate source of “truth.””

    You mean, like gender studies programs all over the world do?

    “arguing against the efforts of suffrage, feminism and/or gender equality.”

    What is wrong with doing any of those things? Are suffrage, feminism and gender equality so sacred to you?

    Suffrage was unfair as women never had to serve in the military, and yes it DID have huge negative impact:
    http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/250093?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents

    Feminism was NEVER about equality, and was always white supremacist from the very beginning:
    https://www.amazon.com/White-Womens-Rights-Origins-Feminism/dp/0195124669/

    “In the film (and in general) there’s not much debate that the patriarchy actually exists.”

    And that’s the problem, because it DOESN’T exist. Not even in Saudi Arabia. 65% of deaths by stoning, 90% of genital mutilation and 60% of rape victims are male in the middle east.

    ” there’s also the implication that at least some men are just as oppressed by the patriarchy as women.”

    That’s only because YOU believe “the patriarchy” exists that you get that impression. You are putting words into MRAs’ mouths. No MRA ever said that “the patriarchy” oppresses men, either in the documentary or elsewhere.

    “What other conclusion can be drawn from the fact that close to 99 percent of all military deaths are males? Or 78 percent of suicides? Or 94 percent of work-related deaths?”

    The conclusion that men have always been the disposable sex. You see, once you take off your ideological “patriarchy goggles”, it IS possible to reach OTHER conclusions.

    “she isn’t necessarily building a case. In fact, the most intriguing segments in the film are her video diaries”

    Yes, you are pleased because she didn’t question your precious feminist beliefs too much.

    “I am a white male, but I too came to call myself a feminist in my college years; education and my life experiences (especially being raised by a single-mother who didn’t make much money) made it easy to do so. I still consider myself a feminist”

    And that’s the problem, isn’t it? Millions of fatherless boys raised by single mothers propping up the feminist establishment. “White male feminists” are responsible for legislating no fault divorce, The Duluth Model, erosion of fathers’ rights, Violence Against Women Act, Title IX, Affirmative Action, and for funding the pipeline of hatred that is gender studies.

    Even back in 1848, 32 “white male feminists” signed a manifesto of hatred of their own, which started all of this:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Declaration_of_Sentiments

    • Hi, borabosna — thanks for commenting. I’ll try to give a more in-depth response to your comment(s) soon.

    • Hello again, borabosna– below I’ve done my best to respond to your comments/questions. When I quote myself, it comes directly form my review which I think you may have been instinctively hostile towards. Also, please remember that I didn’t make the film; I just reviewed it and analyzed it based on my current foundation of knowledge.

      Thanks again for you post.

      You: Please provide a single example of “torrent of censorship, misunderstanding and extreme bitterness (if not hate)” from the MRM. Please.

      Me: “Truthfully, I also hadn’t heard very much about the Men’s Right Movement (MRM) until I watched the “The Red Pill,” …. “I also feel persuaded to dig a little deeper in to all of this.” ….

      Maybe after I dig a little deeper, I can accommodate your request. As of right now, there’s a lot I don’t know about the MRM.

      You: “You mean, like gender studies programs all over the world do?”

      Me: Yes, that’s exactly what I mean.

      You: What is wrong with doing any of those things? Are suffrage, feminism and gender equality so sacred to you?

      Me: Not very much is sacred to me. But am I happy that my girlfriend can vote, my sister can work in a job she enjoys and my mom was able support herself (and me and my siblings) after my dad bailed on us? Yep.

      You: And that’s the problem, because it DOESN’T exist. Not even in Saudi Arabia. 65% of deaths by stoning, 90% of genital mutilation and 60% of rape victims are male in the middle east.

      Me: None of that proves Patriarchy doesn’t exist. Especially in America/ The West. All the countries of the world aren’t run the same way. BTW, how many political offices in Saudi Arabia are held by women?

      You: The conclusion that men have always been the disposable sex. You see, once you take off your ideological “patriarchy goggles”, it IS possible to reach OTHER conclusions.

      Me: “The MRM opposes the view that men should be the “disposable sons” of society.”
      Which other conclusions? I’d sincerely like to know. That’s why I asked, “What other conclusion can be drawn from the fact that close to 99 percent of all military deaths are males? Or 78 percent of suicides? Or 94 percent of work-related deaths?”
      Some men might argue (and I think they actually do in “The Red Pill”) that men being the disposable sons of society is a consequence of patriarchy.

      You: That’s only because YOU believe “the patriarchy” exists that you get that impression. You are putting words into MRAs’ mouths. No MRA ever said that “the patriarchy” oppresses men, either in the documentary or elsewhere.

      Me: “There’s also the IMPLICATION that at least SOME men are just as oppressed by the patriarchy as women.”
      An implication, by definition, is NOT putting words into someone’s mouth, but rather examining claims and identifying potential meanings. No one in the MRA needs to say it for it to be inferred.
      Also, “the patriarchy” oppressing some men” is not the same as the “patriarchy oppresses men.”

      You: Yes, you are pleased because she didn’t question your precious feminist beliefs too much.

      Me: Actually she questioned my beliefs quite a bit. And she questioned her own. Which is why her film is so compelling. “Jaye understands how the ideas of the MRM will be new (if not shocking) to most of us, and it is precisely because of her empathetic approach that we feel compelled to follow her down ‘the rabbit hole.'”
      I welcome my beliefs being challenged. I can make better arguments that way.

      You: And that’s the problem, isn’t it? Millions of fatherless boys raised by single mothers propping up the feminist establishment. “White male feminists” are responsible for legislating no fault divorce, The Duluth Model, erosion of fathers’ rights, Violence Against Women Act, Title IX, Affirmative Action, and for funding the pipeline of hatred that is gender studies.

      Me: I don’t think there necessarily is a “problem.” And maybe what you’re saying about “white male feminists” is true. I’d have to investigate your claims. Assuming they are true, though, they may be negative consequences of something generally positive and good for society.

      You: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Declaration_of_Sentiments
      http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/250093?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents
      https://www.amazon.com/White-Womens-Rights-Origins-Feminism/dp/0195124669/

      Me: Thanks for the recommendations and info! If I get time, I’ll read all of those.

    • Bravo my good man!

  4. Feminism has never been necessary. All of the so-called “gains” that Feminism might have “won” for women, would have been given to them in any event. Men have always worked to improve the lot of women, and when enough labor-saving devices had been invented to free up women’s time from their chores in the home, they immediately set out to lambaste and demonize men for their troubles. From its very inception in 1848, Feminism has always been about hating men and blaming them for every will which has ever befallen woman. Declaring them solely responsible for the situation of women, irrespective of the eons long shared history of co-evolution and women’s own involvement and influence in the shaping of society.

    Fast-forward to today. Women / Feminists are busy “othering” men at every opportunity. You see it happening more and more with total and complete impunity– just look at all the “Women-Only” events, and the one-sided “Women-Only” promotional events picking up pace. Anybody with a brain knows full well that Women / Feminists would be howling to the heavens if any “Men-Only” events took place. They have sued “Men-Only” institutions into practical oblivion.

    All Feminists ever do is demonize Men and seek to tear down everything that is “Male” and “Masculine”. They insinuate themselves, and women by proxy, as the arbiters of everything which is socially valuable and wholesome– meaning anything “Female” oriented, and castigate / shun those things which are perceived to be “Male” oriented. Each round is another push to cast men further and further into the role of “The Other” such that he can ultimately be cast out of “civilized society” by virtue of the fact that he exhibits impure / unclean / dangerous / criminal “Male” traits.

    All this while simultaneously heaping all of the responsibilities of social upkeep upon the man. Requiring him to work to provide the bounty for society, and to sacrifice himself to protect the “weaker” (more privileged) members of society, while denying him any of the benefits and fruits of his labor and service to society– meaning “service to Women”.

    Feminists bind men with their own Male Power and wield it by proxy to control men. “Men do not fear feminists, they fear the State”, which is why Feminists are working hard to become The State.

    Feminism has nothing but hatred and contempt for men. That’s the way it has always been. Sure they point to the dictionary and claim that it’s all about equality, but that’s the one thing that Feminism has never actually been about. From it’s very inception, Feminism has been about hating men– blaming all of the ills of women on men. Albeit they do it through the convenience of the term “Patriarchy” so they can have plausible deniability and claim that they don’t hate *all men*, just “Patriarchy”– which is in essence, “All Men”. Even more so as they define it as the system of society which has been put in place by men to privilege / advantage men over women, thus the “act” of “being male” is sufficient to relegate a man as a member of “The Patriarchy”. This is typical Feminist logic and rhetoric. This is the first step in the process of “othering” Men.

    But getting back to the idea that Feminists “love” men… show me the proof. Show me all of the Feminist love songs for men. Show me all of the Feminist love sonnets for men. Show me all of the great Feminist novels extolling the virtues of men. Show me all of the great Feminist quotes expressing heartfelt love and equanimity and kindness and goodwill for men. Show me all of the Feminist books and articles which sing men’s praises and give thanks or even simple acknowledgment to their many accomplishments. Show me the vast cadre of Feminists toiling away building things, making things, inventing things to make Men’s lives a little easier, or a little better.

    Feminists don’t do anything for men– ever. Unless it somehow benefits Feminists *more*, first and foremost. The only thing that Feminists have for men is the back of their hand and their denouncements and slander and ugly vilifications– the constant daily sludge of “Women Good, Men Bad” which oozes out of every media orifice.

    In contrast, Men work their asses off for Women. They work to feed them, clothe them, give them shelter and all of the comforts of civilization that they can possibly dream up and afford. Men help women in their daily lives. The build things, move things, create things, they provide companionship and protection and resources for their children.

    Since the dawn of time Men have written countless works giving praise to women, wherein they are held up as “special” and “good” and “righteous”– virtues to which men themselves vow to aspire, women are granted automatically. Men honor women for their accomplishments and achievements, and just for being women. Men have sung millions of love songs to women expressing their faithfulness and undying love. Men sing the praises of their women. They hold them up and encourage them to grow and become all that they can be and do. Men even tear each other down at the behest of women, in their eagerness to please and provide what women say they want– even when it isn’t them (the Men).

    Men have beaten back the savage wilderness, farmed the land, tamed the beasts, built the roads, built the towns and villages and cities. Men have created and invented nearly all of the great labor-saving devices throughout history. Men invented commerce, laws, education. Men defend their countries and their women with their blood. Sacrificing themselves on the battlefield, often dying miserable deaths in faraway places in the hope that their women and families can continue on.

    Men keep the engines of society in operation. Men fix things, maintain things, and do all of the dirty, dangerous, risky and icky jobs which are required to keep things going. Men fight the wars, put out the fires, rescue victims of disasters, and police the streets to keep women safe. Men even invented the computers and communications and Internet that Feminists use to excoriate Men with. Men have done their best throughout all of human history to look after, provide for, and protect women– even when they weren’t their specific women, just because they were *women*.

    So what are the ways that Feminists express their love for men? They yell at men. Scream at men. Spit on men. Lambaste men in every conceivable manner from “The Patriarchy” to “Man-Splaining” to “Man-Spreading” to who knows what all else. They accuse men of being “oppressors” and of “hating women”. They tell men they’re creepy, “rapey”, can’t be trusted around children, call them monsters and baby-killers (odd really, considering the number of abortions they have carried out). The demean men, belittle men, slander men, and generally castigate men for anything and everything that pops into their heads– essentially for the crime of “being male”. They tell men that they should be castrated, “reduced to 90% of the population”, put onto “reservations” and “checked out like books”. They show men on TV to be stupid, bumbling, ineffectual, infantile, and incompetent compared to women.

    And the list of Feminist “love” just goes on and on and on. To say nothing of all the wonderful quotes they have left us with, such as “I think man-hating is an honorable and viable political act”, or “all men are rapists and that’s all they are”, and “who cares how men feel or what they do or whether they suffer”. And most especially this gem “Women have always been the primary victims of war. Women lose their husbands, their fathers, their sons in combat.” And there are so many more “loving” sentiments to choose from, it’s hard to pick just one. Oh, and I almost forgot the best sentiment of all– Feminists have declared their independence from men “A woman needs a man like a fish needs a bicycle”.

    It is sincerely refreshing to know that all our hard work hasn’t gone unnoticed and unappreciated. But let me say on that point that I draw an very distinct difference between “Feminists” and “All Women”. I do not believe all women hate men. I do not think that is the case at all. Nor even that all women who consider themselves to be Feminists actually hate all men. Though that specific group I think is more miscategorized / mislabeled. Because “Feminists” themselves do hate men. That is it’s entire raison d’etre– Feminism itself literally cannot exist without Men as foils. It is impossible to define Feminism in such a way that doesn’t assign Men into the role of the antagonists.

    Thus any Men who is operating in the service of Feminism is doing so on a woefully false assumption– that Feminists / Feminism has anything in it for him when in truth Feminism regards him as simply a “useful idiot” and a tool to be used for as long as it yields an advantage, and then cast away and discarded the moment he outlives his usefulness. Yet, at the same time, somewhat perversely, Men operating in the service of Feminists represent the largest threat to Men everywhere as they are the only real and substantial “hard power” that Feminists possess, and are only ever able to utilize “by proxy”. Feminists get to claim they are peaceful and misunderstood because they are able to exercise the “hard power” of their useful idiots– Male Feminists– by proxy instead and thus can plausibly deny involvement in violence and coercive activities. Men are the engine of the State. Feminists are busy positioning themselves to become “The State”.

    Feminists are engaged in a War on Men, all the while perversely claiming it to be a “War on Women”. However, it doesn’t occur to me that men are much interested in prosecuting that war, or really even responding to it– particularly with respect to putting out any significant effort to defend themselves. I don’t think Men really see women as “the enemy”. It is hard for men to perceive that Women (Feminists) could pose a threat to them– or that they would even want to. Thus Men have been very slow to react and mobilize in response to the direct assault by Feminists. And the threat isn’t to “usurp their power” as much as it is a campaign to press men into the role of “the other” and cast them out of civilized society.

    Feminism claims to be about “equality” and yet at every turn demonstrates itself to be about hating men with the aim and ambition of destroying men and relegating them to a service class in society. For all of their protestations to the contrary– By their fruits ye shall know them. And know them we do. Feminism is a hate group.

    Since we’re all here talking about Feminists, why don’t we recall some of those heart-warming, man-loving sentiments made by Feminist thought leaders throughout the decades…

    “To call a man an animal is to flatter him; he’s a machine, a walking dildo.”
    — Valerie Solanas, founder of S.C.U.M. (Society for Cutting Up Men), attempted to murder Andy Warhol in 1968; S.C.U.M. Manifesto (1967)

    “Under patriarchy, every woman’s son is her potential betrayer and also the inevi*table rapist or exploiter of another woman.”
    — Andrea Dworkin, author and anti-pornography activist; Our Blood (1976) p. 20

    “[Rape] is nothing more or less than a conscious process of intimidation by which all men keep all women in a state of fear.”
    — Susan Brownmiller, journalist and author, co-founder of Women Against Pornography; Against Our Will(1975) p. 5

    “The institution of sexual intercourse is anti-feminist.”
    — Ti-Grace Atkinson, author, president of New York NOW and founder of the October 17th Movement; Amazon Odyssey (1974) p. 86

    “I feel that ‘man-hating’ is an honorable and viable political act, that the oppressed have a right to class-hatred against the class that is oppressing them.”
    — Robin Morgan, author and editor for Ms. Magazine; Going Too Far (1978) p. 178

    “Being a housewife is an illegitimate profession… The choice to serve and be protected and plan towards being a family-maker is a choice that shouldn’t be. The heart of radical feminism is to change that.”
    — Vivian Gornick, author and educator at The New School; The Daily Illini (25 April 1981)

    “I feel what they feel: man-hating, that volatile admixture of pity, contempt, disgust, envy, alienation, fear, and rage at men … for the men women share their lives with – husbands, lovers, friends, fathers, brothers, sons, co-workers.”
    — Judith Levine, author and political activist; My Enemy, My Love (1992) p. 3

    “There are times when a woman reading Playboy feels a little like a Jew reading a Nazi manual.”
    — Gloria Steinem, journalist and activist, co-founder of Ms. Magazine, prominent figure of second-wave feminism; McCall’s (October 1970)

    “And if the professional rapist is to be separated from the average dominant heterosexual [male], it may be mainly a quantitative difference.”
    — Susan Griffin, author and recipient of the MacArthur grant and an Emmy for the play Voices; Rape: The All-American Crime; Ramparts Magazine (1971) p. 30

    “I believe that women have a capacity for understanding and compassion which man structurally does not have, does not have it because he cannot have it. He’s just incapable of it.”
    — Barbara Jordan, United States Representative of Texas; Running as a Woman (1994) p. 266

    “Women have always been the primary victims of war. Women lose their husbands, their fathers, their sons in combat. Women often have to flee from the only homes they have ever known.”
    — Hillary Clinton, American diplomat and former senator; First Ladies’ Conference on Domestic Violence, El Salvador, 1998

    “If life is to survive on this planet, there must be a decontamination of the Earth. I think this will be accompanied by an evolutionary process that will result in a drastic reduction of the population of males.”
    — Mary Daly, philosopher and former professor at Boston College (women’s studies and others); “No Man’s Land”; What Is Enlightenment? (Fall/Winter 1999)

    “The proportion of men must be reduced to and maintained at approximately 10% of the human race.”
    — Sally Miller Gearhart, author and former professor of women’s studies at San Francisco State University; The Future – If There Is One – Is Female (1981)

    “Women have very little idea of how much men hate them.”
    — Germaine Greer, author, journalist and former lecturer at the University of Warwick; The Female Eunuch(1970) p. 279

    “Rape represents an extreme behavior, but one that is on a continuum with normal male behavior within the culture.”
    — Mary Koss, researcher and professor of psychology at Kent State University; Sexual Experiences Survey(1982)

    “We have long known that rape has been a way of terrorizing us and keeping us in subjection. Now we also know that we have participated, although unwittingly, in the rape of our minds.”
    — Gerda Lerner, former professor of women’s studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, helped found the field of Women’s History; The Creation of Patriarchy, Volume 1 (1986) p. 225

    “As long as some men use physical force to subjugate females, all men need not … He can beat or kill the woman he claims to love; he can rape women … the vast majority of men in the world do one or more of the above.
    — Marilyn French, author and lecturer, advisor to Al Gore’s presidential campaign; The War Against Women(1992) p. 182

    “[The falsely accused] have a lot of pain, but it is not a pain that I would necessarily have spared them. I think it ideally initiates a process of self-exploration. ‘How do I see women?’ ‘If I did not violate her, could I have?’ … Those are good questions.”
    — Catherine Comins, assistant dean of students at Vassar College; TIME Magazine (June 3 1992)

    “Politically, I call it rape whenever a woman has sex and feels violated.”
    — Catharine MacKinnon, philospher and professor at three universities, presently University of Michigan; A Rally Against Rape (1981)

    “Feminist consciousness is consciousness of victimization … to be aware of an alien and hostile force outside of oneself … For some feminists, this hostile power is ‘society’, or ‘the system’; for others, it is simply men.”
    — Sandra Bartky, professor of philosophy and gender studies at the University of Illinois; Femininity and Domination (1990) p. 15

    “Heterosexuality is a die-hard custom through which male-supremacist institutions insure their own perpetuity and control over us. Women are kept, maintained and contained through terror, violence, and spray of semen.”
    — Cheryl Clarke, author and former educator and dean of students at Rutgers University; Words of Fire (1995) p. 244

    “If the classroom situation is very heteropatriarchal–a large beginning class of 50 to 60 students, say, with few feminist students–I am likely to define my task as largely one of recruitment … of persuading students that women are oppressed.”
    — Joyce Trebilcot, author and former professor of philosophy and women’s studies at Washington University; Who Stole Feminism (1994) p. 92

    “To call a man an animal is to flatter him; he’s a machine, a walking dildo.”
    — Valerie Solanas, founder of S.C.U.M. (Society for Cutting Up Men), attempted to murder Andy Warhol in 1968; S.C.U.M. Manifesto (1967)

    “Under patriarchy, every woman’s son is her potential betrayer and also the inevi*table rapist or exploiter of another woman.”
    — Andrea Dworkin, author and anti-pornography activist; Our Blood (1976) p. 20

    “[Rape] is nothing more or less than a conscious process of intimidation by which all men keep all women in a state of fear.”
    — Susan Brownmiller, journalist and author, co-founder of Women Against Pornography; Against Our Will(1975) p. 5

    “The institution of sexual intercourse is anti-feminist.”
    — Ti-Grace Atkinson, author, president of New York NOW and founder of the October 17th Movement; Amazon Odyssey (1974) p. 86

    “I feel that ‘man-hating’ is an honorable and viable political act, that the oppressed have a right to class-hatred against the class that is oppressing them.”
    — Robin Morgan, author and editor for Ms. Magazine; Going Too Far (1978) p. 178

    “Being a housewife is an illegitimate profession… The choice to serve and be protected and plan towards being a family-maker is a choice that shouldn’t be. The heart of radical feminism is to change that.”
    — Vivian Gornick, author and educator at The New School; The Daily Illini (25 April 1981)

    “I feel what they feel: man-hating, that volatile admixture of pity, contempt, disgust, envy, alienation, fear, and rage at men … for the men women share their lives with – husbands, lovers, friends, fathers, brothers, sons, co-workers.”
    — Judith Levine, author and political activist; My Enemy, My Love (1992) p. 3

    “There are times when a woman reading Playboy feels a little like a Jew reading a Nazi manual.”
    — Gloria Steinem, journalist and activist, co-founder of Ms. Magazine, prominent figure of second-wave feminism; McCall’s (October 1970)

    “And if the professional rapist is to be separated from the average dominant heterosexual [male], it may be mainly a quantitative difference.”
    — Susan Griffin, author and recipient of the MacArthur grant and an Emmy for the play Voices; Rape: The All-American Crime; Ramparts Magazine (1971) p. 30

    “I believe that women have a capacity for understanding and compassion which man structurally does not have, does not have it because he cannot have it. He’s just incapable of it.”
    — Barbara Jordan, United States Representative of Texas; Running as a Woman (1994) p. 266

    “Women have always been the primary victims of war. Women lose their husbands, their fathers, their sons in combat. Women often have to flee from the only homes they have ever known.”
    — Hillary Clinton, American diplomat and former senator; First Ladies’ Conference on Domestic Violence, El Salvador, 1998

    “If life is to survive on this planet, there must be a decontamination of the Earth. I think this will be accompanied by an evolutionary process that will result in a drastic reduction of the population of males.”
    — Mary Daly, philosopher and former professor at Boston College (women’s studies and others); “No Man’s Land”; What Is Enlightenment? (Fall/Winter 1999)

    “The proportion of men must be reduced to and maintained at approximately 10% of the human race.”
    — Sally Miller Gearhart, author and former professor of women’s studies at San Francisco State University; The Future – If There Is One – Is Female (1981)

    “Women have very little idea of how much men hate them.”
    — Germaine Greer, author, journalist and former lecturer at the University of Warwick; The Female Eunuch(1970) p. 279

    “Rape represents an extreme behavior, but one that is on a continuum with normal male behavior within the culture.”
    — Mary Koss, researcher and professor of psychology at Kent State University; Sexual Experiences Survey(1982)

    “We have long known that rape has been a way of terrorizing us and keeping us in subjection. Now we also know that we have participated, although unwittingly, in the rape of our minds.”
    — Gerda Lerner, former professor of women’s studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, helped found the field of Women’s History; The Creation of Patriarchy, Volume 1 (1986) p. 225

    “As long as some men use physical force to subjugate females, all men need not … He can beat or kill the woman he claims to love; he can rape women … the vast majority of men in the world do one or more of the above.
    — Marilyn French, author and lecturer, advisor to Al Gore’s presidential campaign; The War Against Women(1992) p. 182

    “[The falsely accused] have a lot of pain, but it is not a pain that I would necessarily have spared them. I think it ideally initiates a process of self-exploration. ‘How do I see women?’ ‘If I did not violate her, could I have?’ … Those are good questions.”
    — Catherine Comins, assistant dean of students at Vassar College; TIME Magazine (June 3 1992)

    “Politically, I call it rape whenever a woman has sex and feels violated.”
    — Catharine MacKinnon, philospher and professor at three universities, presently University of Michigan; A Rally Against Rape (1981)

    “Feminist consciousness is consciousness of victimization … to be aware of an alien and hostile force outside of oneself … For some feminists, this hostile power is ‘society’, or ‘the system’; for others, it is simply men.”
    — Sandra Bartky, professor of philosophy and gender studies at the University of Illinois; Femininity and Domination (1990) p. 15

    “Heterosexuality is a die-hard custom through which male-supremacist institutions insure their own perpetuity and control over us. Women are kept, maintained and contained through terror, violence, and spray of semen.”
    — Cheryl Clarke, author and former educator and dean of students at Rutgers University; Words of Fire (1995) p. 244

    “If the classroom situation is very heteropatriarchal–a large beginning class of 50 to 60 students, say, with few feminist students–I am likely to define my task as largely one of recruitment … of persuading students that women are oppressed.”
    — Joyce Trebilcot, author and former professor of philosophy and women’s studies at Washington University; Who Stole Feminism (1994) p. 92

    • Hi, Mr E — I appreciate your comment. However, it is very long, so I may not be able to respond. Truthfully, this may not be the appropriate platform for this discussion. Maybe you give the people who are interested in what you have to say a way to reach you elsewhere?

    • Dude, I’m lifting this to a notepad and am going to read it at my leisure after closing this tab. This is quite a piece of work and covers much ground exposing many false-hoods about feminism (like, that it was ever good).

      Surely this is a form comment. Either way, I appreciate you dropping a copy here.

    • You just can’t argue with facts; unless you are a feminist that is…

  5. Very nice review.
    I definitely think genuine, open-minded conversation is what this subject needs. The rules about this subject has long felt stifling and boring, but I’d be very interested in being allowed to hear maverick views without anyone shutting down the conversation.

  6. Dennis E. Markham

    A good review…but seriously, did you just say only white males benefit from this conversation!? EVERY. SINGLE. MRA. ISSUE harms non-white men disproportionately. Criminal sentencing, paternity fraud, boys falling behind in education, parental alienation…etc. etc.

    • Hi, Dennis — thanks for the response. You may be absolutely correct about non-white men being more harmed than white men. Assuming you are, I would argue that is actually a result of discrimination against non-whites in society (of any sex/gender), not entirely because they’re male. Even if the MRM was 100% successful, non-whites would still face prejudice. That’s why I think white men would have the most to gain from the MRM movement. In no way was I implying that non-whites don’t have anything to gain. Perhaps I didn’t make that clear.

      • Yes, you are correct. Men suffer disproportionately in criminal courts, as do blacks (men and women). Black men get it the worst. If I were a feminist, I would call this textbook intersectionality. Not all disproportionate problems are due to prejudice, but some are. Personally, I think that it’s more predatory behavior on the part of prison-owners. I don’t think they are racist, but I think they’re counting on blacks’ disadvantaged position in order to predate upon them even more — they get paid by the prisoner and I don’t think they particularly care what color the person being locked up is, they’re just doing it because they can get away with it.

  7. Overall, a great review. Thank you for keeping an open mind, it is nice to see feminists like yourself starting to be more open to men’s equality. I used to consider myself a feminist too, but unfortunately I found too much opposition of feminists whenever I tried to even mention that men also have issues.

    I’d like to address this paragraph:
    > “Don’t feminists and the MRM have more in common than people think? Shouldn’t both sides working together for a more encompassing gender equality movement? Why aren’t they?” For the most part, those questions remain unanswered.

    The MRM was started by feminists. MRAs have never had any problem with women’s rights. The Red Pill featured Warren Farrell, who started as a feminist leader who marched for women’s rights, as well as Erin Pizzey, who founded the first battered women’s shelter. So MRAs never had any problem with addressing women’s issues. The reason we aren’t working together is because when Warren Farrell started talking about how traditional gender roles harm men too, or when Erin Pizzey started talking about how women also abuse men, other feminists got upset. Perhaps both sides should be working together for equality, but you’ll have to talk to feminists because they’re the only ones who have ever been against the idea of working together to fight for equality. You can even see that in the film. People like to dismiss anti-male feminists as “extremists” but Kathryn Spillar and Michael Kimmel are definitely not extremists, and you could see from The Red Pill that neither one of them cares about men’s issues and both believe that women are the only ones we should focus on. Maybe with more feminists like yourself realizing that men have issues too, you can change the feminist movement to be a movement that supports equality for both genders as much as MRAs always have.

    You also mentioned that an issue like circumcision could be investigated in a documentary of it’s own. I just wanted to let you know that it is: http://circumcisionmovie.com/ with a scheduled release by the end of this year. I’ll look forward to another movie review for that when it comes out!

    • Thanks so much for your response, Bryan. I’m glad you enjoyed the review, and I appreciate the information!

      If I get the chance to review “American Circumcision,” you’ll be the first to know.

  8. Hail Josh, you seem like a decent guy, i have to warn you, don’t think your status as a feminist will shield you, people on your side of the fence are not exactly known for being charitable to heretics, i saw it way to many times, someone questioning the established narrative and being chased out of town, you say you haven’t heard about MRM before you watched this, so here is just a heads up, MRM is indeed a persecuted resistance at this point, we are not just LARPing it like most of the so called civil rights groups with half the media in their pocket, and anyone seeing associating with us risks the same, as Cassie herself found out right soon, and i am not talking just trash talking here, i saw people being publicly smeared, assaulted, having campaigns pointed against them to get them fired and worse, you are a white male, so you stand very low in this food chain, watch out.

    • Samoja, thanks very much for your concern. I don’t think I’ve done anything heretical; film reviews don’t typically get people “run out of town.” Either way, it wouldn’t be the first time. 😉

      • You spoke out on MRM and you did not immediately proclaim them a hate group, for some people that is enough.

      • Josh, I would not be so sure– but here’s hoping it doesn’t in any case.

        I would like to invite you to come to “A Voice For Men” (AvoiceForMen.com) and peruse the articles, engage in the discussions, and come check out the AVFM Forums and share your thoughts, ideas and even your disagreements with us. I’ll be there too, if you like, and happy to discuss anything you’d like– along with everyone else of course.

        Most people in the MHRM did not come to their opinion, viewpoint or mindset overnight. In my case it’s been a 54 year journey.

        People are getting extremely tired and fed up with the fraud of Feminism and are busy rejecting its message of hate, sexism and division in every possible manner. I don’t know what your awareness of “Feminism” is– but if you are a man, you owe it to yourself to do some research into the hateful ideology which is “Feminism”. It’s in their books, in their writings, in their teachings, in their articles, in their speeches and rallies– it’s all about hate. Always has been, still is, and probably always will be. They point to the dictionary all the time– but their actions speak far louder than their words– Feminism is about hate.

      • samoja is right. What you have done already is tantamount to high treason to the noisy wing of feminism. It’s not enough to be neutral toward MRAs, if you are not openly hostile to MRAs you will likely be castigated. That’s a hard way to get red-pilled. But if it ever happens, you know where you can always go. MRAs who have come to our side (we have better cookies) have said that they have never felt so relaxed in that they didn’t have to constantly speak in such a circumspect way, as though walking on egg shells. You can generally speak in a much more free way around MRAs than feminists and other SJWs.

        • My first allegiance is to the freedom of speech and expression for all. Especially those I disagree with. I don’t mind if that makes me a heretic (I don’t think it does.)

          I’m glad you have found you a platform where you can speak freely.

          So long as its a civil conversation, you can say whatever you’d like to me/ on this thread.

          Thanks for your comments.

  9. Excellent movie review. Very interesting. Also, well-thought-out replies. I’d like to add my two cents.

    I graduated high school before second-wave feminism came along. I was raised with traditional double standards. Today I hear this was an era completely run by men to the advantage of men. But nobody asked me if I wanted the male role. I had no choice in how I was socialized. And socialization was not flowing only from men. Mothers and female elementary school teachers laid in most of the foundation. By age 12, I understood I had to walk a different path than females did. I understood the basics of what I had to sacrifice on behalf of females, and what they had to sacrifice on behalf of me. It was my job to stuff my feelings, face death, hold a job on behalf of others, etc. This is not privilege. It’s responsibility.

    When feminism came along, I was an instant supporter. Eventually I attended a Statewide conference for feminist men. There I asked when we were going start dealing with major men’s issues. The response I got was not positive. Something to do with “the politics.” Their attitude didn’t surprise me. It fit right into the traditional male sex role. We’re supposed to stay in the water and freeze while women get into the lifeboats. Except this time it was the gender-liberation lifeboats.

    Men’s issues are not a result of recent advances by women. Most of the issues predate feminism. Some do not. The notion that men had all the advantages before feminism is simply not true.

    As for The Red Pill, I think it’s the best introduction to men’s issues. In less than two hours, one can learn a good deal of what MRAs have been saying for decades.

    • Hi, Keith. Thank you so much for your comments. I’m glad you thought the review was interesting to comment on it.

      I appreciate your two cents and your personal experience.

      In particular, “I had no choice in how I was socialized.” Its really quite insightful. Most people aren’t in control of how they’re socialized. And its that same forced socialization that has created prejudice of all kinds to all types people: women, the queer community, racial minorities, religious minorities… or so it is argued.

      Why can’t it be true that forced socialization has created prejudice towards men? Are the “gender-liberation lifeboats” a form of that?

      Very intriguing.

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